Index on Censorship http://www.indexoncensorship.org the voice of free expression Thu, 18 Dec 2014 16:42:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=472 the voice of free expression Index on Censorship no the voice of free expression Index on Censorship http://www.indexoncensorship.org/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/Free_Speech_Bites_Logo.jpg http://www.indexoncensorship.org A victory for opponents of free speech http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/victory-opponents-free-speech/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/victory-opponents-free-speech/#comments Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:35:31 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62601 Sony’s decision to pull U.S. film The Interview from distribution after threats underlines the continuing trend of failure to protect artistic freedom of expression. “Clearly this sets an example for other anonymous groups to put a curb on artistic expression through threats. This opens the door for anyone to level a threat against artistic works […]

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Sony’s decision to pull U.S. film The Interview from distribution after threats underlines the continuing trend of failure to protect artistic freedom of expression.

“Clearly this sets an example for other anonymous groups to put a curb on artistic expression through threats. This opens the door for anyone to level a threat against artistic works that they don’t agree with or find distasteful,” Rachael Jolley, editor of Index on Censorship magazine said.

Sony’s decision to postpone the film on the basis of public safety follows what the company calls an “unprecedented” assault by hackers on its business and employees. The film’s derailing comes as the main North American theatre chains halted plans to show the release amid hackers’ warnings to the public to stay away.

“Sony should take steps to stand up for the free expression of its filmmakers by reconsidering its decision or releasing the film online,” Jolley said.

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The information war between Russia and Ukraine http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/information-war-russia-ukraine/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/information-war-russia-ukraine/#comments Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:45:27 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62584 In the Winter 2014 issue of Index on Censorship magazine, Andrei Aliaksandrau investigates the new information war as he travels across Ukraine

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A makeshift shrine remembers the Ukrainians killed during the protests in Maidan Square. (Photo: Sean Gallagher for Index on Censorship)

A makeshift shrine remembers the Ukrainians killed during protests on Maidan Nezalezhnosti. (Photo: Sean Gallagher / Index on Censorship)

“There is no civil war in Ukraine. It is a war between Russia and Ukraine, and it is inspired by heavy Russian propaganda,” says Volodymyr Parasyuk as we sit in a café on the main square of the regional capital Lviv in western Ukraine.

This year Parasyuk became a national hero in his country. Some say he changed history when he made a passionate speech on Maidan Nezalezhnosti in Kiev on 21 February 2014, after the police killed about 100 protesters. Parasyuk, head of a sotnia, a unit of 100 men, and part of the protesters’ defence force, demanded President Yanukovich resign and said otherwise protesters would launch an armed attack. The next day the head of state fled the country, and there was a new government formed in Ukraine.

Parasyuk knows what he is saying about war. He joined a voluntary battalion of Ukrainian forces and fought separatists in the east of his country during the summer and autumn. He was wounded and spent a couple of days in detention, but managed to escape.

“This is direct aggression by the Kremlin against my country. This war is completely directed from Russia. We do not have internal reasons to fight each other, the conflict is provoked by lies and propaganda that come from the east,” says Parasyuk.

Statues near  Maidan Nezalezhnosti celebrate the friendship between Russia and the Ukraine. (Photo: Sean Gallagher / Index on Censorship)

Statues near Maidan Nezalezhnosti celebrate the friendship between Russia and the Ukraine. (Photo: Sean Gallagher / Index on Censorship)

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This excerpt was posted on 18 December 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

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Padraig Reidy: The paranoid style in Turkish politics http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/padraig-reidy-the-paranoid-style-in-turkish-politics/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/padraig-reidy-the-paranoid-style-in-turkish-politics/#comments Thu, 18 Dec 2014 10:44:43 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62559 What’s wrong with Turkey? Or, more to the point what is wrong with Turkey’s president that makes him so determined to fight, like a two a.m. drunk vowing to take on all comers?

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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Photo: Philip Janek / Demotix)

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Photo: Philip Janek / Demotix)

What’s wrong with Turkey? Or, more to the point what is wrong with Turkey’s president that makes him so determined to fight, like a two a.m. drunk vowing to take on all comers?

In the past week alone, Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and his allies have launched attacks on his former ally Fethullah Gülen and his followers, novelists Orhan Pamuk and Elif Shafak, and even supporters of Istanbul soccer club Besiktas. It would be foolish to attempt to rank these attacks in terms of importance or urgency, but the attack on the Gülenites is the most interesting.

The Gülen movement was almost unknown to anyone outside Turkey and the Turkish diaspora until 2008, when Fethullah Gülen topped an online poll run jointly by Prospect and Foreign Policy magazines. The poll was almost certainly hijacked by members of the movement, which its leader modestly claims doesn’t really exist (“[S]ome people may regard my views well and show respect to me, and I hope they have not deceived themselves in doing so,” Gülen conceded in an interview with Foreign Policy. “Some people think that I am a leader of a movement. Some think that there is a central organization responsible for all the institutions they wrongly think affiliated with me. They ignore the zeal of many to serve humanity and to gain God’s good pleasure in doing so.”)

The movement, known to some as “Hizmet”, is seen as bearing great power in Turkey. In a country well used to conspiracy theories about secret organisations — such as the perceived ultra-nationalist, ultra-secular Ergenekon — it is unsurprising that the Gülenists attract suspicion. Their cultishness does little to allay that sentiment.

Among the many weapons at the disposal of the movement are its newspapers, the Turkish Zaman and English-language Today’s Zaman. It was journalists from Zaman, among others perceived as Gülenites, who were arrested over the weekend, as reported by Index.

The move by Erdoğan against Gülenists is widely seen as part of Erdoğan’s defence against allegations of corruption within his party — allegations he believes are led by Gülenists within the police and other agencies.

With their journalists arrested, the Gülenists now find themselves facing the kind of censorship they themselves espoused not so long ago.

In 2011, journalist Ahmet Sik was working on a book called Army of the Imam, which was sought to expose the Gülenists’ connections with the police. The manuscript was seized by authorities. When Andrew Finkel, then a columnist with Today’s Zaman (and occasional Index contributor), submitted an article suggesting that the Gülen movement should not support such censorship, he was sacked by the paper. (The column subsequently appeared in rival English-language newspaper Hurriyet Daily News)

It’s tempting amid all this to wish for a plague on all their houses. But as one Turkey watcher pointed out to me, it’s inevitable that some innocents will get caught in the crossfire between the former allies in Erdoğan’s Islamist AK party and the Gülen movement.

Meanwhile, in keeping with the paranoid style of Turkish politics, pro-Erdoğan newspaper Takvim identified an external enemy in the shape of an “international literature lobby”.

The agents of that lobby, which is clearly anti-Turkish rather than pro-free speech, were identified as Orhan Pamuk and Elif Shafak. It is, in its own way, true that Shafak and Pamuk are part of the international literature lobby: London-based Shafak can often be seen at English PEN events, and Pamuk has long been identified as a literary and free speech hero around the world. But it is an enormous stretch to imagine that the novelists of the world are gathering in smoke-filled rooms plotting the overthrow of the Turkish state, rather than just hoping that Turkish people should be allowed write and read books in peace. Takvim went as far as to imagine that the authors were paid agents of the “literature lobby”, which is to make the terrible mistake of imagining there’s money in free speech. No matter: paranoia excels at inventing its own truths.

Amidst all this, less glamorous than Pamuk and Shafak, less powerful than Gülen and Erdoğan, fans of Besiktas football club too face persecution. The “Çarşı” group are claimed to have attempted a coup against the government after playing a prominent role in the Gezi park protests. Supporters of the tough working class Istanbul club, known as the Black Eagles, have a reputation for anti-authoritarianism and political activism. According to Euronews’ Bora Bayraktar: “While the court’s verdict is uncertain, what is known is that the Çarşı fans – often proud to be ahead of their rivals – have become the first football supporters’ group to be accused of an attempted coup.”

A source in Istanbul tells Index that when asked how he answered to the charge of fomenting a coup, one accused supporter replied: “If we’re that strong we would make Beşiktaş the champions!”, a prospect as unlikely for the underdog club as a dull but functioning liberal democracy seems for Turkey.

This article was posted on 18 December 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

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Winter 2014: Drafting freedom to last http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/winter-2014-drafting-freedom-last/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/winter-2014-drafting-freedom-last/#comments Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:51:00 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62423 This bumper issue has plenty to read and digest over the holiday and New Year period. Packed inside this issue, are; an interview with fantasy writer Neil Gaiman; new cartoons from South America drawn especially for this magazine by Bonil and Rayma; new poetry from Australia; and the first ever English translation of Hanoch Levin’s […]

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This bumper issue has plenty to read and digest over the holiday and New Year period.

Packed inside this issue, are; an interview with fantasy writer Neil Gaiman; new cartoons from South America drawn especially for this magazine by Bonil and Rayma; new poetry from Australia; and the first ever English translation of Hanoch Levin’s Diary of a Censor; plus articles from Turkey, South Africa, South Korea, Russia and Ukraine.

Also in this issue, authors from around the world including The Observer’s Robert McCrum, Turkish novelist Elif Shafak, and Nobel nominee Rita El Khayat consider which clauses they would draft into a 21st century version of the Magna Carta. This collaboration kicks off a special report Drafting Freedom To Last: The Magna Carta’s Past and Present Influences. Also inside: from Mexico a review of its constitution and its flawed justice system and Turkish novelist Kaya Genç looks at recent intimidation of women writers in Turkey.

Click here to subscribe to Index: subscribe before 31 December and receive 25% off your order (print only)

CONTENTS: ISSUE 43, 4 – Drafting freedom to last

SPECIAL REPORT

Making a 21st-century Magna Carta – Robert McCrum, Hans-Joachim Neubauer, Danny Sriskandarajah, Rita El Khayat, Elif Shafak, Renata Avila, Ferial Haffajee and Stuart White suggest a modern version

1215 and all thatJohn Crace writes a digested Magna Carta

Stripsearch cartoon – Martin Rowson imagines a shock twist for King John

Battle royal – Mark Fenn on Thailand’s harsh crackdown on critics of the monarchy

Land and freedom? – Ritu Menon writes about Indian women gaining power through property

Give me liberty – Peter Kellner on democracy’s debt to the Magna Carta

Constitutionally challenged – Duncan Tucker reports on Mexico’s struggle with state power

Courting disapproval – Shahira Amin on Egypt’s declining justice as the anniversary of the military takeover approaches

Digging into the power system – Sue Branford reports on the growth of indigenous movements in Ecuador and Bolivia

Critical role – Natasha Joseph on how South African justice deals with witchcraft claims

Global view – Jodie Ginsberg writes about the power of noise in the fight against censorship

IN FOCUS

Brave new war – Andrei Aliaksandrau reports on the information war between Russia and Ukraine

Propaganda war obscures Russian soldiers’ deaths – Helen Womack writes about reports of secret burials

Azeri attack – Rebecca Vincent reports on how writers and artists face prison in Azerbaijan

The political is personal  – Arzu Geybullayeva, Azerbaijani journalist, speaks out on the pressures

Really good omens – Martin Rowson interviews fantasy writer Neil Gaiman, listen to our podcast

Police (in)action – Simon Callow argues that authorities should protect staging of controversial plays

Drawing fire – Rayma and Bonil, South American cartoonists’ battle with censorship

Thoughts policed – Max Wind-Cowie writes about a climate where politicians fear to speak their mind

Media under siege or a freer press? – Vicky Baker interviews Argentina’s media defender

Turkey’s “treacherous” women journalists – Kaya Genç writes about dangerous times for female reporters, watch a short video interview

Dark arts – Nargis Tashpulatova talks to three Uzbek artists who speak out on state constraints

Talk is cheap – Steven Borowiec on state control of South Korea’s instant messaging app

Fear of faith – Jemimah Steinfeld looks at a year of persecution for China’s Christians

Time travel to web of the past and future – Mike Godwin’s internet predictions revisited, two decades on

CULTURE

Language lessons – Chen Xiwo writes about how Chinese authors worldwide must not ignore readers at home

Spirit unleashed – Diane Fahey, poetry inspired by an asylum seeker’s tragedy

Diary unlocked – Hanoch Levin’s short story is translated into English for the first time

Oz on trial – John Kinsella, poems on Australia’s “new era of censorship”

Index around the world – Aimée Hamilton gives an update on Index on Censorship’s work

Humour on record – Vicky Baker  on why parody videos need to be protected

 

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Turkey: “An attack on women journalists is an attack on freedom” http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/turkey-kaya-genc-talks-about-the-intimidation-of-women-journalists/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/turkey-kaya-genc-talks-about-the-intimidation-of-women-journalists/#comments Wed, 17 Dec 2014 11:24:24 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62542 Turkish novelist and contributing editor for Index on Censorship magazine, Kaya Genç, gives a short interview about the intimidation of female journalists in Turkey, read his full report in the winter issue

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“An attack on women journalists is an attack on freedom,” says novelist Kaya Genç, in a short video interview ahead of the publication of his article on the intimidation of women journalists in Turkey in the latest Index on Censorship magazine.

Genç’s comments come as the country has been gripped by a crackdown on opposition and members of the media.

Genç, a Turkish novelist based in Istanbul, is a contributing editor to Index on Censorship magazine.

Subscribe to Index on Censorship magazine by Dec 31, 2014 for 25% off a print subscription.

This article was posted on 17 Dec 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

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Index on Censorship joins net neutrality coalition http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/index-censorship-joins-net-neutrality-coalition/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/index-censorship-joins-net-neutrality-coalition/#comments Mon, 15 Dec 2014 17:24:34 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62501 Index on Censorship joins the net neutrality coalition, a global coalition of organisations and users who believe that the open internet has enabled countless advances in technology, health, education and business, and that it must remain open for all. Today, the open internet is endangered by powerful service providers seeking to become gatekeepers who decide […]

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Index on Censorship joins the net neutrality coalition, a global coalition of organisations and users who believe that the open internet has enabled countless advances in technology, health, education and business, and that it must remain open for all.

Today, the open internet is endangered by powerful service providers seeking to become gatekeepers who decide how users can access part of the internet.

We believe that we have to enshrine net neutrality into law so that the internet remains a platform for free expression and innovation.

“A free and open internet is vital for free expression,” said Index Chief Executive Jodie Ginsberg. “We must defend net neutrality to ensure everyone has equal access to the channels that have become crucial to so much of modern information exchange.”

Join us and find out more at http://www.thisisnetneutrality.org/

Watch the video below on how net neutrality works:

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Şanar Yurdatapan: “The censorship and oppression on culture and arts is still going on” http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/sanar-yurdatapan-censorship-oppression-culture-arts-still-going/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/sanar-yurdatapan-censorship-oppression-culture-arts-still-going/#comments Mon, 15 Dec 2014 14:55:28 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62125 Winner of the 2002 Index award for Circumvention of Censorship, Şanar Yurdatapan talks to Index about artistic censorship

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Şanar Yurdatapan is a songwriter and composer who campaigns for freedom of expression, particularly against the prosecution of publishers in his home country, Turkey.

Yurdatapan won the 2002 Index award for Circumvention of Censorship, to his amusement this was the same year former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi won the award for Services to Censorship.

In 2013, Yurdatapan and Index met at the IFEX General Meeting and Strategy Conference, which he attended on behalf of Initiative for Freedom of Expression; he talked to Index about the Gezi Park protests which were going on at the time. Now, Yurdatapan speaks about the positive effects of international recognition.

Explore the Index on Censorship Freedom of Expression Awards

This article was posted on 15 Dec 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

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#IndexDrawtheLine: How can we balance religious freedom and religious extremism? http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/indexdrawtheline-how-can-we-balance-religious-freedom-and-religious-extremism/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/indexdrawtheline-how-can-we-balance-religious-freedom-and-religious-extremism/#comments Mon, 15 Dec 2014 13:39:30 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62461 Religious freedom and religious radicalism which leads to extremism has become an increasingly difficult balancing act in the digital age where presenting religious superiority through fear and “terror” is possible both locally and internationally at internet speeds. The ongoing series of beheading videos released by the Islamic State and the showcase of kidnapped school girls by Nigeria’s Boko […]

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Religious freedom and religious radicalism which leads to extremism has become an increasingly difficult balancing act in the digital age where presenting religious superiority through fear and “terror” is possible both locally and internationally at internet speeds.

The ongoing series of beheading videos released by the Islamic State and the showcase of kidnapped school girls by Nigeria’s Boko Haram on YouTube are both examples that test the extent to which the UN Convention of Human Rights can protect religious freedoms. According to a report by the International Humanist and Ethical Union, Egypt’s Youth Ministry are targeting young atheists vocal on social media about the dangers of religion. In Saudi Arabia, Raef Badawi was sentenced to seven years in prison in 2013 and received 600 lashes for discussing other versions of Islam, besides Wahhabism, online.

Article 18 of the Convention states that the “right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance”. The interpretation of “practice” is a grey area – especially when the idea of violence as a form of punishment can be understood differently across various cultures. Is it right to criticise societies operating under Sharia law that include amputation as punishment, ‘hadd’ offences that include theft, and stoning for committing adultery?

Religious extremism should not only be questioned under the categories of violence or social unrest. Earlier this month, religious preservation in India has led to the banning of a Bollywood film scene deemed ‘un-Islamic’ in values. The actress in question was from Pakistan, and sentenced to 26 years in prison for acting out a marriage scene depicting the Prophet Muhammad’s daughter. In Russia, the state has banned the publication of Jehovah’s Witness material as the views are considered extremist.

In an environment where religious freedom is tested under different laws and cultures, where do you draw the line on international grounds to foster positive forms of belief?

This article was posted on 15 December 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

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Turkey: Government detains journalists http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/turkey-government-detains-journalists/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/turkey-government-detains-journalists/#comments Mon, 15 Dec 2014 11:39:18 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62463 On Sunday, December 14, at least 27 people were detained by Turkish police, including journalists, producers and directors of TV shows and police officers. Arrest warrants were issued for at least 31.

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On Sunday, December 14, at least 27 people were detained by Turkish police, including journalists, producers and directors of TV shows and police officers. Arrest warrants were issued for at least 31.

The offices of the newspaper Zaman and of the television network Samanyolu TV were raided by police. A warrant for the arrest of Zaman editor in chief Ekrem Dumanlı was at first incomplete, prompting police to return later on Sunday to arrest Dumanlı. Hidayet Karaca, manager of Samanyolu TV, was also detained, as well as Samanyolu producer Salih Asan and director Engin Koç, who were arrested in the city Eskişehir. Warrants were also issued for Makbule Çam Alemdağ, a writer for a Samanyolu show, and Nuh Gönültaş, a columnist for the newspaper Bugün. Bianet has published a list of those detained yesterday.

A large group of protesters gathered outside of Zaman’s Istanbul offices, holding signs that read “Free press cannot be silenced”.

Zaman and Samanyolu TV have been singled out by Turkish President Erdogan for being part of what Erdogan calls a “parallel structure” affiliated with exiled cleric Fethullah Gülen. Erdogan has accused Gülen of being at the centre of plots to topple the government.

The prosecutor in charge of Sunday’s operation said that those detained are being charged with involvement in a terrorist organisation, while some are accused of fraud and slander.

The raids were announced by the Twitter user “Fuat Avni” (a pseudonym) on December 13. Fuat Avni tweeted a list of 47 people for whom there would be arrest warrants.

On Monday Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan attacked the European Union for criticising the arrests that targeted opposition media outlets, telling the EU to “mind its own business.”

“The European Union cannot interfere in steps taken … within the rule of law against elements that threaten our national security,” Erdogan said in a televised speech. “They should mind their own business,” he added, in his first comments after Sunday’s raids.

EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini and enlargement commissioner Johannes Hahn on Sunday condemned police raids as going “against the European values” and said they were “incompatible with the freedom of media, which is a core principle of democracy.”

Recent media freedom violations from Turkey via mediafreedom.ushahidi.com:

EU project overshadowed by arbitrary media ban

BirGün newspaper to undergo investigation for critical coverage

Journalists assaulted, prevented from photographing

Economist and Taraf correspondent threatened on Twitter

Journalist sentenced to community service for insult

This article was updated on 15 December 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

This article was originally and updated at mediafreedom.ushahidi.com on 15 December 2014

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Exploring ​artistic freedom in Wales and beyond http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/%e2%80%8bart-freedom-wales-%e2%80%8band-beyond/ http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2014/12/%e2%80%8bart-freedom-wales-%e2%80%8band-beyond/#comments Mon, 15 Dec 2014 08:17:49 +0000 http://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=62226 Index on Censorship has been​ exploring artistic freedom of expression and contemporary forms of censorship in the ​UK. Who or what controls what is sayable in the arts? W​ho has a voice in the arts? Do the answers vary as we move around the different ​member ​nations of the UK​?

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​Index on Censorship has been​ exploring artistic freedom of expression and contemporary forms of censorship in the ​UK. Who or what controls what is sayable in the arts? W​ho has a voice in the arts? Do the answers vary as we move around the different ​member ​nations of the UK​?

Looking at our culture through the prism of artistic freedom of expression opens up questions about the power relations between artists​, venues​, audience​s​, ​the ​police, the ​media and community interest.

Our initial ​case study Beyond Belief – theatre, freedom of expression and the police offered insight into how these relationships are ​​often played out in the present day​.  Deepening our exploration, conferences in London in 2013​ and Belfast ​in early 2014, ​have been followed by a programme of work in Wales in the latter half of this year. Art Freedom Wales was Index’s exploration of whether Wales is enjoying its right to artistic free expression.​

​Across all three projects, ​it is becoming clear there are massive pressures on what is sayable in the arts–rifts around ​what is acceptable to funders, to the audience, to ​public opinion, or ​even health and safety. It is also clear that there are significant questions around the issue of access to artistic expression–for established and aspiring artists, as well as the public at large. Events this past summer at the Barbican around Brett Bailey’s Exhibit B have underlined recurring questions around the role of the police and the media in shaping what gets to be seen.

In 2015, Index is planning ​to explore the state of artistic freedom in Scotland ​before holding a state of the nations event which will bring together​ key players to discuss how to reinforce support for artistic expression across the UK.​

ArtFreedomWales

Over the past few months Index’s project ArtFreedomWales has hosted a series of online discussions with artists from across Wales​–established artists, emerging artists and artists working in Welsh. ​You can ​catch up with everything that’s been said here.

​These discussions, and the issues they raised​,​​ informed our approach to a​ Free Speech Hearing in Cardiff on 27 November. As a culmination of the project, the hearing invited practitioners from across art forms alongside policy makers and cultural gatekeepers to ​come together to discuss the question “Is Wales enjoying its right to freedom of artistic expression?”

To open the hearing, Index invited Turkish playwright Meltem Arikan, an established artist, with direct experience of censorship​ who is now living in exile in Wales, to survey the Welsh arts scene from the eye of an outsider.​

​This was followed ​with an array of evidence volunteered from across Wales, short presentations surfacing a number of topics from offence to rumour, and self-censorship to cultural education.

Moving from the stage to discussion between peers, major themes and concerns were examined in more detail in breakout sessions.

Finally, a panel discussion featuring Dai Smith (Arts Council Wales), John McGrath (National Theatre Wales), David Anderson (Museums Wales), Lleucu Siencyn (Literature Wales) and Elen ap Robert (Pontio) asked how leading organisations in Wales might take on some of the issues raised during the afternoon?

This article was posted on Dec 10, 2014 at indexoncensorship.org

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