Index on Censorship https://www.indexoncensorship.org the voice of free expression Wed, 19 Aug 2015 09:32:45 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 the voice of free expression Index on Censorship no the voice of free expression Index on Censorship http://www.indexoncensorship.org/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/Free_Speech_Bites_Logo.jpg https://www.indexoncensorship.org Muira McCammon: GiTMO’s linguistic isolation https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/muira-mccammon-gitmos-linguistic-isolation/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/muira-mccammon-gitmos-linguistic-isolation/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 08:28:45 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68779 Index on Censorship youth advisory board member Muira McCammon discusses linguistic isolation at Guantanamo Bay

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This is the fifth of a series of posts written by members of Index on Censorship’s youth advisory board.

Members of the board were asked to write a blog discussing one free speech issue in their country. The resulting posts exhibit a range of challenges to freedom of expression globally, from UK crackdowns on speakers in universities, to Indian criminal defamation law, to the South African Film Board’s newly published guidelines.


Muira McCammon is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

Muira McCammon is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

Guantanamo Bay (GiTMO) is a place where language barriers embody part of the institution’s social architecture.

Two years ago, Peter Jan Honigsberg of the University of San Francisco wrote about linguistic isolation, using the experiences of an Uzbek detainee to highlight this reality. But, we know that during various points throughout GiTMO’s history, dictionaries have been used and even written by detainees. In March 2004, the U.S. Joint Task Force Guantanamo published a revision of its 2003 Camp Delta Standard Operating Procedure, adding “dictionaries” to the list of materials banned from the Guantanamo Bay detainee library. There was no immediate reason given for this policy change, even though, according to a report later released by the US Department of Defense, detainees speak  over 18 native languages.

Furthermore, Mahvish Khan, an interpreter and Pashtun-American lawyer, published My Guantanamo Diary: The Detainees and the Stories They Told Me. In the book, Khan shared this anecdote about Taj Mohammad, a then twentysomething from Kunar, Afghanistan:

“He asked us repeatedly to bring him a Pashto-English dictionary so that he could improve his English. Over several months, he had compiled and memorised a list of almost one thousand English words. But during a routine search, the guards had found and confiscated his neatly written glossary.”

Speech is a fickle concept in detention centres, and the story of Mohammad’s confiscated, self-written lexicographic resource raises questions about how detainees in GiTMO or any detention centre for that matter can effectively combat linguistic isolation.

Muira McCammon, USA

Related:
Ravian Ruys: Without trust, free speech suffers
Jade Jackman: An act against knowledge and thought
Harsh Ghildiyal: Defamation is not a crime
Tom Carter: No-platforming Nigel
Matthew Brown: Spying on NGOs a step too far
About the Index on Censorship youth advisory board
Facebook discussion: no-platforming of speakers at universities

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Ravian Ruys: Without trust, free speech suffers https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/ravian-ruys-without-trust-free-speech-suffers/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/ravian-ruys-without-trust-free-speech-suffers/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 08:27:47 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68785 Index on Censorship youth advisory board member Ravian Ruys explores the impact of eroding public trust is having on free expression in The Netherlands

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This is the sixth of a series of posts written by members of Index on Censorship’s youth advisory board.

Members of the board were asked to write a blog discussing one free speech issue in their country. The resulting posts exhibit a range of challenges to freedom of expression globally, from UK crackdowns on speakers in universities, to Indian criminal defamation law, to the South African Film Board’s newly published guidelines.


Ravian Ruys is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

Ravian Ruys is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

“Haat imam” is a man whose life solely depends on the complete destruction of western values and interests, or so one would think if you were reading or watching the Dutch media.

It is a word used whenever we are talking of an imam whose views are considered either too conservative or too radical. In most cases, when someone is labelled a haat imam, they are subject to protest or no-platforming. In 2015, there have been three known cases of events being cancelled because some of the speakers were labelled haat imams. In these incidences, the individuals involved were investigated by Dutch security services and considered safe, meaning they were found to have no known links to terrorist organisations.

All this has led the Volkspartij voor Vrijheid en Democratie (People’s Party for Freedom and Democracy), a political party currently in power, to advocate a blacklist for radical preachers. The party warns that this blacklist should not only include those Muslim preachers who have known links to terrorist organisations, but also those who spread hate.

This means public pressure leads to the narrowing of freedom of speech for one specific group of people. It has also created a feeling of persecution surrounding young Muslims, made even worse by the deputy prime minister quoting flawed scientific research stating that 80 per cent of young Dutch-Turks support ISIS.

If you are a Muslim in the Netherlands, you are now in an environment where you feel you must be the nicest Muslim anyone has ever met or you can’t be trusted. Perversely, this lack of trust is often quoted as one of the things that drives young Muslim  men and women into the arms of extremist organisations. Consequently, a policy trying to protect us against extremist propaganda works in favour of the extremists.

The Netherlands has a great reputation when it comes to freedom of speech and we should keep it that way. This means creating a fair and equal space for Muslims in our country to debate their religion on their terms. We might not always like what we hear, but we cannot intervene directly unless a direct threat is made against innocents. If we do not trust those involved, in other words, if we do not trust our fellow countrymen, how can we expect their trust in return?

Without trust, politics and civil society become a bloody mess.

Ravian Ruys, The Netherlands

Related:
Muira McCammon: GiTMO’s linguistic isolation
Jade Jackman: An act against knowledge and thought
Harsh Ghildiyal: Defamation is not a crime
Tom Carter: No-platforming Nigel
Matthew Brown: Spying on NGOs a step too far
About the Index on Censorship youth advisory board
Facebook discussion: no-platforming of speakers at universities

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Student reading lists: journalism and censorship https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/student-reading-list-journalism-and-censorship/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/student-reading-list-journalism-and-censorship/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 12:41:21 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68193 Much of Index on Censorship’s global work involves allowing censored journalists an outlet to publish articles which may be unpublished in their home countries. This reading list, focusing on journalism, looks at issues surrounding freedom of expression and press freedom.

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Much of Index on Censorship’s global work involves allowing censored journalists an outlet to publish articles which may be unpublished in their home countries. This reading list, focusing on journalism, looks at issues surrounding freedom of expression and press freedom. It includes articles from Professor Emily Bell on the tools moving journalism forward and Professor Richard Sambrook’s reflection on the murders of journalists around the world that go unnoticed.

Students and academics can browse the Index magazine archive in thousands of university libraries via Sage Journals.

Journalism and censorship articles


Student reading lists

Censorship in the arts
Comedy and censorship
Journalism and censorship
Minority groups and censorship
About the student reading lists


Explosion of independent journalism by Stefan Bratkowski

Stefan Bratkowski, April 1987; vol. 16, 4: pp. 17-18

A message from Warsaw to the London censorship conference from a dissident

Back to the future by Iona Craig

Iona Craig, September 2014; vol. 43 , 3: pp. 8-12

Award-winning foreign correspondent Iona Craig discusses the growing need for journalist in war zones to go back to old ways of ignoring surveillance

The spirit of journalism by Ocak Isik Yurtcu

Ocak Isik Yurtcu, March 1997; vol. 26, 2: pp. 99-103

An imprisoned Turkish journalist, serving 15 years for anti-terror charges, discusses his experiences

Generation Why by Ian Hargreaves

In Index’s special report on the future of journalism, Ian Hargreaves considers whether the next generation of journalists will work with the public to hold the powerful to account

Users + Tools = Journalism by Emily Bell

Emily Bell, November 2007; vol. 36, 4: pp. 100-104

The Guardian’s Emily Bell on how technology is shaping the future of news and what editors need to do to adapt

Print Running by Will Gore

Will Gore, September 2014; vol. 43, 3: pp. 51-54

Another one from the special report on journalism, The Independent’s Will Gore looks at journalistic innovation

Re-writing the future: five young journalists from around the world by Ahlam Mohsen, Katharina Frick, Luca Rovinalti, Athandiwe Saba and Bhanuj Kappal

Ahlam Mohsen, Katharina Frick, Luca Rovinalti, Athandiwe Saba, Bhanuj Kappal, September 2014; vol. 43, 3: pp. 18-19

Five young journalists, from Yemen, South Africa, Germany, India and the Czech Republic, share their hopes for the profession

In quest of journalism by Jay Rosen

Jay Rosen, May 1997; vol. 26, 3: pp. 81-89

Michael Foley interviews New York University’s professor of journalism, Jay Rosen

Attack on ambition by Dina Meza

Dina Meza, September 2014; vol. 43, 3: pp. 30-33

Human rights campaigner and Index on Censorship Freedom of Expression Award’s nominee Dina Meza talks about the situation in Honduras where young journalists are entering a profession rife with corruption and fear

Journalists are dying every day by Richard Sambrook

Richard Sambrook, March 2015; vol. 44, 1: pp. 101-102

Professor Richard Sambrook delivers a morbid account of how the deaths of journalists around the world are going unnoticed

The reading list for journalism and censorship can be found here

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Jade Jackman: An act against knowledge and thought https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/jade-jackman-an-act-against-knowledge-and-thought/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/jade-jackman-an-act-against-knowledge-and-thought/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 08:47:34 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68767 Index on Censorship youth advisory board member Jade Jackman explains why she thinks counter-terrorism legislation is a threat to academic freedom

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This is the fourth of a series of posts written by members of Index on Censorship’s youth advisory board.

Members of the board were asked to write a blog discussing one free speech issue in their country. The resulting posts exhibit a range of challenges to freedom of expression globally, from UK crackdowns on speakers in universities, to Indian criminal defamation law, to the South African Film Board’s newly published guidelines.


Jade Jackman is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

Jade Jackman is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

On 12 February 2015, the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act became law in the UK. If the fact that it is the seventh counter-terrorism bill in 14 years wasn’t enough to demonstrate the creep of governmental control, part five of the new legislation poses a direct and disturbing threat not just to freedom of expression but to knowledge and thought as well.

Part five of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act places a statutory duty on public authorities to prevent terrorism. Under this remit falls schools and universities; places that used to be woven with the notion of free thought. The directions contained in the statute are unclear and gives universities the right to ban, exclude and prevent discussions that certain officials deem to incite radicalisation.

However, freedom of academic thought or discussion is not even the sole concern. London School of Economics Student Union’s community and welfare officer Aysha said: “Students who go to support services will now not be entitled to confidentiality under the new act if that person is deemed a ‘threat’, which is incredibly racialised.” In short, there is the potential that students would be unable to voice personal concerns, or the need for support, due to stereotypes that this act will enforce.

Jade Jackman, UK

Related:
Harsh Ghildiyal: Defamation is not a crime
Tom Carter: No-platforming Nigel
Matthew Brown: Spying on NGOs a step too far
About the Index on Censorship youth advisory board
Facebook discussion: no-platforming of speakers at universities

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Harsh Ghildiyal: Defamation is not a crime https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/harsh-ghildiyal-defamation-is-not-a-crime/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/harsh-ghildiyal-defamation-is-not-a-crime/#comments Tue, 18 Aug 2015 08:46:33 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68764 Index on Censorship youth advisory board member Harsh Ghildiyal explains why he thinks India's criminal defamation laws are not reasonable

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This is the third of a series of posts written by members of Index on Censorship’s youth advisory board.

Members of the board were asked to write a blog discussing one free speech issue in their country. The resulting posts exhibit a range of challenges to freedom of expression globally, from UK crackdowns on speakers in universities, to Indian criminal defamation law, to the South African Film Board’s newly published guidelines.


Harsh Ghildiyal is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn  more

Harsh Ghildiyal is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

Sections 499 and 500 of the Indian Penal Code, 1860, which criminalise defamation, have been challenged before the Supreme Court of India. In addition, sections of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973, which provide the procedure for prosecution, have been challenged.

Over the years, through several cases, the Supreme Court has made it clear that restrictions in place on speech must be reasonable, and only to the extent that they are necessary. Defamation is expressly listed as one of these reasonable restrictions but criminal defamation is not in the least bit reasonable. If the restriction goes beyond the intended purpose, it must be struck down.

Criminal defamation cases have been filed against the media, politicians and individuals for their statements. While adequate remedies for defamation exist under civil law, the provision criminalising defamation provides for imprisonment of up to two years, a fine or both. The punishment is disproportionate to an act which doesn’t go against society but against individuals.

More often than not used for dampening legitimate criticism rather than actually serving its purpose, criminal defamation is clearly not a reasonable restriction and can act as an impediment to free speech.

Harsh Ghildiyal, India

Related:
Jade Jackman: An act against knowledge and thought
Tom Carter: No-platforming Nigel
Matthew Brown: Spying on NGOs a step too far
About the Index on Censorship youth advisory board
Facebook discussion: no-platforming of speakers at universities

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Bahrain: Magazine sent to jailed academic and blogger https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/bahrain-magazine-sent-to-jailed-academic-and-blogger/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/bahrain-magazine-sent-to-jailed-academic-and-blogger/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 16:10:59 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68728 Editor Rachael Jolley mailed the latest copy of Index on Censorship magazine Fired, threatened, imprisoned... is academic freedom being eroded? to jailed Bahraini academic and blogger

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Today marks the 150th day of prominent Bahraini academic and blogger Dr. Abduljalil Al-Singace’s hunger strike.

Al-Singace is protesting prison conditions in Bahrain. He is currently being held in solitary confinement at Al Qalaa hospital due to his poor health, and is reportedly being denied access to the full medical assistance he requires. Al-Singace, who has been promoting human rights in Bahrain since 2000, is serving a life sentence for allegedly plotting to overthrow the government.

Index’s magazine editor, Rachael Jolley, responded to a call by English Pen to send a magazine for Abduljalil Al-Singace along with a copy of the letter below via the Ministry of Information.

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You too can express your support for Al-Singace by signing the petition asking for the immediate and unconditional release of Al-Singace and of all those detained in Bahrain in violation of their right to freedom of expression.

You can also join the social media campaign for Al-Singace by sharing details of his case with your friends and contacts using #SingaceHungerStrike.

Letter to the Ministry of Interior

Ministry of Interior
Capital Governorate Police Directorate
P.O Box 13
Manama
Bahrain

Dear Sir/Madam

I am writing to you on behalf of Index on Censorship and as a supporter of English PEN regarding the ongoing detention of Dr Abduljalil Al-Singace.

According to PEN’s information, Dr Al-Singace, a prominent academic and blogger, is currently serving a life sentence in Bahrain. I share PEN’s concerns that Al-Singace has allegedly been subject to torture and ill-treatment whilst detained, and that he has now been on hunger strike for 150 days. I also join PEN in calling on the authorities to ensure that Dr Al-Singace has access to the medical attention he urgently requires.

Whilst remaining extremely concerned for Dr Al-Singace’s health and well-being, I welcome the news that he will once again be allowed access to magazines and newspapers.

Please find enclosed a copy of Index on Censorship magazine “Fired, threatened, imprisoned… Is academic freedom being eroded?”, which I would be most grateful if you are able to pass on to Dr. Al-Singace on our behalf.

Yours sincerely

Rachael Jolley,
Editor, Index on Censorship magazine

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Tom Carter: No-platforming Nigel https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/tom-carter-no-platforming-nigel/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/tom-carter-no-platforming-nigel/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 15:29:32 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68740 Index on Censorship youth advisory board member Tom Carter explains why he thinks no-platforming undermines free expression

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This is the second of a series of posts written by members of Index on Censorship’s youth advisory board.

Members of the board were asked to write a blog discussing one free speech issue in their country. The resulting posts exhibit a range of challenges to freedom of expression globally, from UK crackdowns on speakers in universities, to Indian criminal defamation law, to the South African Film Board’s newly published guidelines.


Tom Carter is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

Tom Carter is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more

Universities are meant to be institutions that embody the spirit of free expression. They are places where new ideas are formulated and environments where students are exposed to a range of viewpoints. However, whilst freedom of expression in universities is under threat from government intervention, another threat to freedom of expression on UK campuses is originating from the students themselves.

In October 2014, UKIP’s Nigel Farage was invited by the University of Cambridge’s politics department to give an address on an undisclosed topic. This prompted two independent Facebook campaigns, one of which was from the Cambridge University Students’ Union Women’s Campaign imploring Cambridge to rescind the invitation, which it eventually was.

This is indicative of an increasing hostility among UK students towards the expression of ideas deemed unacceptable. Whether or not you agree or disagree with UKIP’s policies, they are the UK’s third largest party by vote share and very much constitute part of the political mainstream.

The fact that students are now willing to influence the speaker choices of universities is a worrying trend. Only by hearing views different to your own can your ideas be refined and fine-tuned and hearing policies expressed in public discussion is the only way to scrutinise them effectively.

Tom Carter, UK

Related:
Matthew Brown: Spying on NGOs a step too far
About the Index on Censorship youth advisory board
Facebook discussion: no-platforming of speakers at universities

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Matthew Brown: Spying on NGOs a step too far https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/matthew-brown-spying-on-ngos-a-step-too-far/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/matthew-brown-spying-on-ngos-a-step-too-far/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 13:34:32 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68724 Index youth advisory board member Matthew Brown explores why he thinks mass surveillance has gone too far.

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The new cohort of the Index on Censorship youth advisory board was launched last month. The board is already participating in discussions on Facebook.

Members of the board were asked to write a blog discussing one free speech issue in their country. The resulting posts exhibit a range of challenges to freedom of expression globally, from UK crackdowns on speakers in universities, to Indian criminal defamation law, to the South African Film Board’s newly published guidelines.

In the first of a series of posts, youth board member Matthew Brown explores mass surveillance in the UK.


Matthew Brown is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more.

Matthew Brown is a member of the Index youth advisory board. Learn more.

I don’t often begin writing by quoting Herman Goering but on one account he was worryingly accurate. Goering stated that: “The people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.”

Increasing levels of surveillance are often justified as essential in protecting us from imminent attack but the recent revelation that GCHQ spied illegally on Amnesty International, an organisation relying upon the secrecy of their communications with human rights defenders, demonstrates the extent to which state surveillance methods are now out of control.

It is easy to scorn states known for their dictatorial regimes but our society has only progressed to its current position through holding the state to account. If we fail to continue to do so, then the slide towards a world in which freedom of expression is restricted at any given moment the government decides appropriate is inevitable. The interception of the correspondence of NGOs raises the worrying question of how these organisations can continue their crucial work if their confidential correspondence is likely to end up out of their hands.

Matthew Brown, UK

Related:
Tom Carter: No-platforming Nigel
About the Index on Censorship youth advisory board
Facebook discussion: no-platforming of speakers at universities

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Letter: Why was Homegrown cancelled? https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/letter-why-was-homegrown-cancelled/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/letter-why-was-homegrown-cancelled/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2015 09:29:18 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68721 Index on Censorship joined English PEN in a letter calling for transparency around the cancellation of the National Youth Theatre production of Homegrown

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The following letter was published in The Times.

Sir, The abrupt cancellation of the National Youth Theatre’s production of Homegrown is a troubling moment for British theatre and freedom of expression. The play seeks to examine radicalisation and disaffection among British youth. Its cancellation serves only to shut down conversation on these important issues. We fear that government policy in response to extremism may be creating a culture of caution in the arts.

We are deeply concerned by reports that the NYT may have been put under external pressure to change the location and then cancel the production. Police, local authorities and arts organisations have a duty to respect and protect freedom of expression — even, and most especially, where they disagree with the message or find it controversial.We urge the NYT to give a full account of what led to the decision, and hope that a way can be found to stage it so that the young voices involved can be heard and the production can be judged on its merits.

Maureen Freely, president, English PEN
David Aaronovitch, chair, Index on Censorship
Jodie Ginsberg, chief executive, Index on Censorship
Jo Glanville, director, English PEN
Shami Chakrabarti, director, Liberty
Anish Kapoor, artist
Anneliese Davidsen, executive director, Unicorn Theatre
Christopher Haydon, artistic director, Gate Theatre
Sir David Hare, playwright
David Lan, artistic director, Young Vic
Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti, playwright
Heydon Prowse, actor
Jolyon Rubinstein, actor
Howard Brenton, playwright
Josie Rourke, artistic director, Donmar Warehouse
Lorne Campbell, artistic director, Northern Stage
Monica Ali, writer
Timberlake Wertenbake, playwright
Nell Leyshon, playwright
Nick Williams, executive director, Actors Touring Company
Ramin Gray, artistic director, Actors Touring Company
Sabrina Mahfouz, playwright
Sarah Frankcom, artistic director, Royal Exchange Theatre Manchester
Simon Callow, actor
Stella Odunlami, artist and performer

Related:
The Times: Why was Homegrown cancelled?
Index calls for transparency on Homegrown cancellation (13 August 2015)
Creative team behind Homegrown “deeply shocked” by cancellation (13 August 2015)
Cancellation of Homegrown is very worrying (5 August 2015)

law-pack-promo-art-3

Child Protection: PDF | web

Counter Terrorism: PDF | web

Public Order: PDF | web

Obscene Publications (available autumn 2015)
Race and Religion (available autumn 2015)

Art and the Law main page

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27 Aug: The Revolution Will Be Televised & Zambezi News https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/27-aug-the-revolution-will-be-televised-zambezi-news/ https://www.indexoncensorship.org/2015/08/27-aug-the-revolution-will-be-televised-zambezi-news/#comments Fri, 14 Aug 2015 15:09:51 +0000 https://www.indexoncensorship.org/?p=68711 The Bafta-winning duo Heydon Prowse and Jolyon Rubinstein, of BBC Three’s comedy series The Revolution Will Be Televised are joining their award-winning Zimbabwean counterparts Zambezi News for a very special one-off show at The Comedy Café Theatre, London.

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The Bafta-winning duo Heydon Prowse and Jolyon Rubinstein, of BBC Three’s comedy series The Revolution Will Be Televised are joining their award-winning Zimbabwean counterparts Zambezi News for a very special one-off show at The Comedy Café Theatre, London.

Featuring Zambezi News Live – a 30 minute satirical sketch performance from Comrade Fatso, Outspoken and Michael K that hilariously tackles issues from race to sex, politics to sport and hip-hop to land reform. The story of Zambezi News, the comedians poking fun at power in Zimbabwe, was covered in the latest issue of Index on Censorship magazine.

The Zimbabweans will then be joined onstage by Heydon and Jolyon to share stories, swap jokes and explore experiences of censorship and free speech on both sides of the Sahara.

When: Thursday 27th August, 8.00pm
Where: The Comedy Cafe, 68 Rivington St, Shoreditch, London, SE2 (Map/directions)
Tickets: £10 in advance, £12 on the door. Book here.

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Presented in partnership with The Comedy Cafe Theatre

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Stand Up For Satire in Support of Index on CensorshipIndex on Censorship has been publishing articles on satire by writers across the globe throughout its 43-year history. Ahead of our event, Stand Up for Satire, we published a series of archival posts from the magazine on satire and its connection with freedom of expression.

14 July: The power of satirical comedy in Zimbabwe by Samm Farai Monro | 17 July: How to Win Friends and Influence an Election by Rowan Atkinson | 21 July: Comfort Zones by Scott Capurro | 24 July: They shoot comedians by Jamie Garzon | 28 July: Comedy is everywhere by Milan Kundera | Student reading lists: Comedy and censorship


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