19 Oct: How does a climate of censorship affect art?
Kiryl Kanstantsinau, Siarhei Kvachonak, Andrei Urazau and Pavel Haradnitski performing in Burning Doors. (Photo by Nicolai Khalezin for Belarus Free Theatre)

Kiryl Kanstantsinau, Siarhei Kvachonak, Andrei Urazau and Pavel Haradnitski performing in Burning Doors. (Photo by Nicolai Khalezin for Belarus Free Theatre)

Body Politic is Dance Umbrella’s strand of discussions and debates focusing on key cultural issues affecting dance and performance.

How does a climate of censorship affect art? There are different ways of not being allowed to speak. In this discussion, we ask artists how issues of censorship, both public and private, are reflected in their art. How does censorship affect the language of the body? Are there things we cannot say, even when not using language?

This event will be chaired by Julia Farrington, Index on Censorship.

The panel will include Dance Umbrella 2016 (DU16) Festival choreographer Jamila Johnson-Small, Natalia Kaliada, founding co-artistic director of Belarus Free Theatre and Pelin Başaran, an arts curator and producer from Turkey.

This is a Dance Umbrella initiative, presented in partnership with Free Word, Index on Censorship and One Dance UK.

When: 17:15 Wednesday 19 Oct 2016

Where: Free Word Centre, 60 Farringdon Road, London EC1R 3GA (map)

Tickets: £5 from Free Word Centre

One response to “19 Oct: How does a climate of censorship affect art?”

  1. Art is freedom within boundaries.
    The limits might be physical. They might be financial or intellectual. Sometimes they’re social or political.
    Dance, for example, is limited in part by gravity, in part by biology; and its beauty and power depend on these limits.
    Painting is limited by the dimensions, surface, shape of the canvas, the physics of light, the type of paint used…
    The problem with state censorship is not that it limits, but that it is predicated on the notion that the government owns in some way the censored person.

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