STATEMENT
The charges against Julian Assange are a threat to press freedom
24 May 2019
BY INDEX ON CENSORSHIP

Julian Assange attending a press conference at the Geneva Press Club in Geneva. Credit: Flikr/Antonio Marín Segovia

Throughout history, governments have used security legislation to stop journalists publishing information that is in the public interest, and they continue to do so today. Index is extremely concerned by announcements from the US government that it will take 17 new criminal charges against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange under the Espionage Act.

The charges are that Assange unlawfully obtained and disclosed national defence information.

Index believes that this is a threat to press freedom in the USA and that it also sends a signal to other countries that may entrench or encourage their position to pursue and prosecute journalists who cover national security stories under similar legislation.

Commitment to freedom of speech is about a principle, not a person. Those principles must continue to be defended.

Let them know they are not forgotten

Join us in sending messages of support to six human rights activists and journalists around the world who are #JailedNotForgotten

Index launches report looking at the real-world effects of Slapps on journalists

As 60 organisations come together to ask the EU to develop legislation to stop vexatious lawsuits, we publish journalists’ accounts of being slapped with legal action

Disease control?

Mapping attacks on media freedom during the coronavirus crisis

Project Exile: Turkish journalist still fearful in Germany

Turkish journalist Zübeyde Sari began her career in 2009. By 2018, following President Erdogan’s crack down on the media, she was forced to flee.

Comments are closed.