NEWS
Turkey: Six journalists remain in prison while lawyers expelled from court
13 Nov 2017
BY KYRA MCNAUGHTON
Brothers Ahmet Altan and Mehmet Altan

Brothers Ahmet Altan and Mehmet Altan

Turkish journalists Ahmet Altan and Mehmet Altan’s defence attorneys were forced to leave the courtroom as their clients stood trial Monday 13 November, accused of taking part in Turkey’s failed 2016 coup. Both brothers are prominent Turkish journalists, known for their critical reporting on president Erdogan’s regime. 

Ahmet and Mehmet Altan, along with Nazlı Ilıcak, also face three aggravated life sentences for supposedly committing crimes on behalf of the Gulen movement, considered a terrorist organisation after the failed coup.

The lawyers were ordered to leave on the grounds that they were speaking without permission, according to Bianet. They were prevented from making a statement of defence, at which point they were removed from the courtroom. “This incident displays the intolerance towards the defence. We’ve been taken out of the courtroom for attempting to exercise the right of defence,” lawyer Ergin Cinmen told Bianet.

“The persecution of journalists and disregard for the rule of law continues on a shocking scale in Turkey,” said Joy Hyvarinen, acting head of advocacy at Index on Censorship. “We urge the Turkish authorities to reconsider.”

Without lawyers present, the court then ruled that the Altan brothers — along with four other journalists — will remain in pretrial detention. The hearings will resume on 11 December.

Turkey’s repressive regime turns academic’s life upside-down

“There is no future, no jobs for us as long as Erdogan and the AKP rule the country.”

In colonised Kurdish society even the flowers can be labelled terrorists

When Turkish forces attacked Kurdish villages in the southeast of the country in 2016 after the collapse of a ceasefire between Ankara and the Kurdish Workers’ Party in July 2015, journalist Nurcan Baysal was there to document the human rights violations.

Journalism in Exile: “Turkey had turned into hell for journalism”

It’s 2016. Turkey is in a state of emergency after the failed coup d’etat of the President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan government. Journalists like Yavuz Baydar are going to be more at risk than ever before.

Work of the Kurdish and Turkish diaspora essential to strengthen Turkey’s democratic opposition, exiled academic says

Naif Bezwan cannot pinpoint a certain moment in his life in which he decided to pursue academia. For Bezwan, rather, it has been a gradual process of situating his personal narrative within the context of his Kurdish community, within Turkey and within the world.

Kyra McNaughton

Kyra McNaughton

Kyra McNaughton is an intern at Index on Censorship and a third-year student at American University in Washington, DC, where she studies journalism and political science.
Kyra McNaughton

Comments are closed.