OPINION
Remember the victims of Charlie Hebdo

As a trial commences in France to prosecute accomplices to the Charlie Hebdo murders, we remember the victims of the brutal crime

03 Sep 2020
BY RUTH SMEETH
The cartoonist Georges Wolinski in 2007. Wolinksi was killed at the Charlie Hebdo office in 2015 aged 80. Credit: Alvaro/Wikimedia Commons
The cartoonist Georges Wolinski in 2007. Wolinksi was killed at the Charlie Hebdo office in 2015 aged 80. Credit: Alvaro/Wikimedia Commons

Frédéric Boisseau
Franck Brinsolaro
Jean Cabut
Elsa Cayat
Stéphane Charbonnier
Philippe Honoré
Bernard Maris
Ahmed Merabet
Mustapha Ourrad
Michel Renaud
Bernard Verlhac
Georges Wolinski

These people were brutally murdered on 7th January 2015.  Their “crime” was to work for the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo.

Whatever your views on the content of the magazine, on their cartoons, their editorial line and their publication of an image of the Prophet Mohammed, the reality is that these people were massacred because of a cartoon. They didn’t threaten anyone. They just went to work on a normal day and were never to return to their families.

This week a terror trial has commenced in France. Fourteen people are charged with being accomplices to the terrorists who murdered 12 people at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, injured a further 11 people and then two days later murdered four people at a Jewish supermarket.

These were acts of terror. Designed to silence and scare. They were attacks on free expression and on freedom of religious belief. They were a hate crime. And even worse they led to more hate, more fear and more abuse towards the French Muslim community.

Index won’t publish the names of the perpetrators. These people sought to divide their country. They sought to sow the seeds of hate and distrust. They are not worthy of our time or consideration.

Today we remember the victims, the survivors and their friends and families. There is nothing more to say.

Comments are closed.

Index logo white

Join us to protect and promote freedom of speech in the UK and across the world.
Since 1972, Index on Censorship has been leading the campaign for free expression.
Our award-winning magazine originally provided the platform for the untold stories of dissidents and resistance from behind the Iron Curtain and is now a home for some of the greatest campaigning writers of our age.
Journalistic freedom, artistic expression, the right to protest, the right to speak your mind, wherever you live.  These are the founding principles of Index on Censorship.
So join us, by subscribing to our newsletter or making a donation, to use your voice to ensure that everyone else can be heard too.
Go to the Index on Censorship home page