ISSUE: VOLUME 46.02 SUMMER 2017
100 years on

What difference Russia's revolution makes to our freedom today

The summer 2017 issue of Index on Censorship magazine explores how the consequences of the 1917 Russian Revolution still affect freedoms today, in Russia and around the world. Andrei Arkhangelsky argues that the Soviet impulse to censor never left Russia, North Korea art expert BG Muhn shows how the nation's art was initially, at least, affected by the USSR, and Nina Khrushcheva, a great-granddaughter of Nikita Khrushchev, reflects on the Soviet echoes in Trump’s use of the phrase “enemies of the people”. Read the full contents

CONTRIBUTORS

Jonathan Tel
Short story writer
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Nina Khrushcheva
Writer and academic
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Rafael Marques de Morais
Journalist
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